Team History - 1994-2006

Although quite short plenty has happened.
Fyrish was formed in 1994 under the Fyrish Racing Team with sponsorship coming from Thornton cycles of Inverness. 
 The team was heavily involved in racing at that time and travelled all over Scotland and England chasing various series points.   In 1995 Thorntons closed and Fyrish went without sponsorship from there on.
Numerous top ten placings were turned in by Mark Campbell, Tommy Quinn, Colin Wilson, Martin Macbeath and Gordon Mackenzie culminating in Mark Campbell lifting the Scottish Junior series title in 1996 and to date he is the only champion the club has ever had.
1997 was the last year the club was involved in racing and after that riders went their different ways although the riding never stopped.
All was quiet until a Spanish road trip in 2001 led to an unofficial reforming in 2002 when new tops were designed
 and more organised group rides started to take place with rides like the Fyrish Boxing day bash where in 2004 twenty nine riders climbed the hill to have a dram!
Emphasis was now on riding for enjoyment although there are still racers amongst us with Mike and Kyle Gordon chasing Sxc points. 
The arrival of endurance racing in Scotland saw Fyrish take second in the inagural 10 under the Ben race in 2005 and another second place in 2006 and a fine third place in Scotlands first 24 hour race the relentless in 2006.
 Plans are well under way for a busy 2007 both riding and racing and it will all be history soon enough.

Rockius Technicalis- Since 2001

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Monument History

The Fyrish Monument was built sometime around 1782 on Cnoc Fyrish, near Evanton, on the orders of Sir Hector Munro, 8th of Novar, a native lord of the area who had served in India as a general. As the local population were being cleared off their land to make way for sheep, employment was a problem and so it was built to give the locals some work. It represents the Gate of Negapatam, a port in Madras, India, which General Munro took for the British in 1781. It is visible from almost anywhere in the parishes of Kiltearn and Alness.

There is a myth about the building of the Fyrish Monument, relating to the commissioning of it by Sir Hector Munro. It is said that Sir Munro was a generous man, looking to help the local villagers in their time of unemployment. As the villagers would not take his charity, he instead paid them, as noted, to build the monument. The myth goes that after the villagers had transported the large boulders that the monument is made out of to the top of the hill it is situated on, Sir Hector Munro (presumably with help) rolled all of the stones down the hill again. He could then pay the villagers double the amount for them having to complete the task twice.

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